All-Oregon

All-Oregon Home
Oregon Cities
Oregon Businesses
Oregon Real Estate
Oregon Events

Oregon Lodging
Oregon Attractions
Oregon Recreation
Oregon Shopping

Oregon Lodging

Oregon Attractions
Casinos
Covered Bridges
Gardens
Historic Buildings
Hot Springs
Lighthouses
Museums
National Forests
State Parks
Theatre
Tours
Unique to Oregon
Vineyards

Add Your Site

Subscribe to the
All-Oregon Newsletter
It's FREE!

Each issue will bring you fun Oregon information,
upcoming Oregon events, travel ideas and more. 
Just send an email to jackiefarris@all-oregon.com
to receive your first issue.  (We do not sell or give our email list to anyone.)




Oregon National Forests

Deschutes National Forest
The Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests along with the Crooked River National Grassland encompass just over 2.5 million acres of Central Oregon. These public lands extend about 100 miles along the east side of the Cascade Mountains crest and eastward into the Ochoco Mountains. They are rich in human and natural history and radiate variety offering a multitude of diverse scenic and recreation opportunities. Alpine forests and lush meadows, sparkling lakes and scenic rivers, dense evergreen forests, and lava caves are contained within the spectacular snow capped volcanic peaks of the Cascade Mountain Range to the west and high desert to the east. Newberry National Volcanic Monument offers an up close and personal look at volcanoes and is home to the endangered pumice grape fern.

  

Fremont National Forest
The Fremont National Forest is located east of the Cascade Mountains, in the high-elevation lava tablelands of south-central Oregon. The Forest totals 1,198,301 acres. The Oregon-California border marks the Forest's southern boundary, while its eastern boundary includes part of the Warner Range. To the north and west it is bounded by the Deschutes and Winema National Forests. Lake County, in which most of the Forest lies, is sparsely populated. Lakeview, with a population of 2,800, is the 8,359-square-mile county's largest town. A gentle to moderate terrain prevails over most of the Forest and elevations range between 4,000 and 8,000 feet above sea level. Slopes are generally 40% or less, although steep slopes along fault scarps and in narrow drainages are not uncommon.

Malheur National Forest
The 1.7 million acre Malheur National Forest is located in the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon. The diverse and beautiful scenery of the forest includes high desert grasslands, sage and juniper, pine, fir and other tree species, and the hidden gems of alpine lakes and meadows. Elevations vary from about 4000 feet (1200 meters) to the 9038 foot (2754 meters) top of Strawberry Mountain. The Strawberry Mountain range extends east to west through the center of the Forest.

Mt. Hood National Forest
Located twenty miles east of the city of Portland, Oregon, and the northern Willamette River valley, the Mt. Hood National Forest extends south from the strikingly beautiful Columbia River Gorge across more than sixty miles of forested mountains, lakes and streams to Olallie Scenic Area, a high lake basin under the slopes of Mt. Jefferson. The Forest encompasses some 1,067,043 acres. Our many visitors enjoy fishing, camping, boating and hiking in the summer, hunting in the fall, and skiing and other snow sports in the winter. Berry-picking and mushroom collection are popular, and for many area residents, a trip in December to cut the family's Christmas tree is a long standing tradition.

Ochoco National Forest
The Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests along with the Crooked River National Grassland encompass just over 2.5 million acres of Central Oregon. These public lands extend about 100 miles along the east side of the Cascade Mountains crest and eastward into the Ochoco Mountains. They are rich in human and natural history and radiate variety offering a multitude of diverse scenic and recreation opportunities. Alpine forests and lush meadows, sparkling lakes and scenic rivers, dense evergreen forests, and lava caves are contained within the spectacular snow capped volcanic peaks of the Cascade Mountain Range to the west and high desert to the east. Newberry National Volcanic Monument offers an up close and personal look at volcanoes and is home to the endangered pumice grape fern.

Rogue River National Forests
Located in southwestern Oregon, along the California/Oregon state line, the Forest ranges from the crest of the Cascades Mountains west into the Siskiyou Mountains, nearly to the Pacific Ocean. The Forest covers almost 1.8 million acres; portions of the Applegate and Illinois River drainages extend into northern California. The Rogue River drains over 75 percent of the Forestís land area. Your Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest embraces a treasure of botanical diversity, and is home to incredible wild and scenic rivers (over 200 miles), isolated wildernesses (324,000 acres), outstanding fisheries and wildlife resources, and breath-taking landscapes of mountains, meadows, streams, and lakes.

Siskiyou National Forests
Located in southwestern Oregon, along the California/Oregon state line, the Forest ranges from the crest of the Cascades Mountains west into the Siskiyou Mountains, nearly to the Pacific Ocean. The Forest covers almost 1.8 million acres; portions of the Applegate and Illinois River drainages extend into northern California. The Rogue River drains over 75 percent of the Forestís land area. Your Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest embraces a treasure of botanical diversity, and is home to incredible wild and scenic rivers (over 200 miles), isolated wildernesses (324,000 acres), outstanding fisheries and wildlife resources, and breath-taking landscapes of mountains, meadows, streams, and lakes.

Siuslaw National Forest
The Siuslaw National Forest is a very diverse and productive region extending from Tillamook to Coos Bay along the Oregon coast. The forest encompasses over 630,000 acres of unique and varying ecosystems. The Forest is situated within the Oregon Coast Range, a mountain range that runs north to south from the Columbia River to north central California. The Siuslaw National Forest is bordered on the east by the Willamette Valley and the west by the Pacific Ocean and is one of only two national forests located in the lower 48 states to claim oceanfront property. Marys Peak, the highest peak in the Coast Range at elevation 4,097, is a prominent view west of Corvallis.

Umatilla National Forest
The Umatilla National Forest, located in the Blue Mountains of southeast Washington and northeast Oregon, covers 1.4 million acres of diverse landscapes and plant communities. The Forest has some mountainous terrain, but most of the Forest consists of v-shaped valleys separated by narrow ridges or plateaus. The landscape also includes heavily timbered slopes, grassland ridges and benches, and bold basalt outcroppings. Elevation range from 1,600 to 8,000 feet above sea level. Changes in weather are common, but summers are generally warm and dry with cool evenings. Cold, snowy winters and mild temperatures during spring and fall can be expected.

Umpqua National Forest
The Umpqua National Forest covers nearly one million acres located along the western slopes of the Cascade Mountains in southwest Oregon. The Forest encompasses a diverse area of rugged mountains to 9200 feet in elevation, sparkling rivers and lakes, and deep canyons, producing a wealth of water resources, timber, wildlife, fish habitat, minerals, and outdoor recreation opportunities. Included within the Forest are the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River, a portion of the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, three wilderness areas, the Oregon Cascades Recreation Area, and the Diamond Lake Recreation Composite, one of the largest developed recreational facilities within the Forest Service.

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest
The Wallowa -Whitman National Forest contains 2.3 million acres ranging in elevation from 875 feet in Hells Canyon, to 9845 feet in the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Our varied forests are managed as sustainable ecosystems providing clean water, wildlife habitat and valuable forest products. And, for things to do and places to be, the Wallowa-Whitman is the setting for a variety of year-round recreation. You are welcome at the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. The Forest ranges from the Blue Mountains and rugged Wallowa Mountains down to the spectacular canyon country of the Snake River on the Idaho border. It is the largest National Forest administrative unit in the Pacific Northwest Region.

Willamette National Forest
The Willamette National Forest stretches for 110 miles along the western slopes of the Cascade Range in western Oregon. It extends from the Mt. Jefferson area east of Salem to the Calapooya Mountains northeast of Roseburg. The Forest is 1,675,407 acres in size. The varied landscape of high mountains, narrow canyons, cascading streams, and wooded slopes offer excellent opportunities for visitors and make the Forest valuable for many purposes.

Winema National Forest
The 1.1 million acre Winema National Forest lies on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountain Range in South Central Oregon, an area noted for its year-round sunshine. The Forest borders Crater Lake National Park near the crest of the Cascades and stretches eastward into the Klamath River Basin. Near the floor of the Basin the Forest gives way to vast marshes and meadows associated with Upper Klamath Lake and the Williamson River. To the north and east extensive stands of ponderosa and lodgepole pine grow on deep pumice and ash which blanketed the area during the eruption of Mt. Mazama (now Crater Lake) nearly 7,000 years ago.

back to top